History of the Chestnut Ridge

The Faith Healer
Chestnut Ridge Farm
Richmond Remember When...
Stage Coach Stop

The community of Chestnut Ridge is located along the crest of Elk Ridge where US Highway 231 follows the contour of the land. Current county lines join here for Bedford, Moore, and Lincoln Counties, with Marshall joining within close proximity. According to Tim Marsh, Bedford County historian, “The ridge received its name from the abundance of huge chestnut trees that covered the Elk Ridge for generations. Sadly in the 1930’s these wonderful works of nature completely disappeared. The road followed the ridge to the County line by Glidewell’s Old Stage Stop, now Chestnut Ridge Community, thence on to Shelbyville. This was first a narrow, deep rutted dirt road but long before the Civil War, it was chartered as a turnpike when it was macadamized (covered by crushed stones) the better to accommodate the north-south stage coaches.”

Perhaps the Greer Company, the first to survey the area, travelled along this ridge as they scouted land. One of the early landowners was Thomas Henderson Glidewell who ran an ordinary (tavern or country inn) at the stagecoach stop. Another early settler on the Ridge was James Prosser, who is thought to have made his home in Bartlett Hollow circa 1813. He married Frances Richardson and they raised a large family there. They believed in the value of education and many of their children enrolled in school. Abner Freeman, another early settler and large landowner, is buried on his property atop the Ridge, along with his first three wives who predeceased him. All four graves are marked with fieldstones. Freeman’s fourth wife is buried in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church Cemetery with a proper headstone. The Mount Hermon Church and adjoining cemetery is located on land obtained from Freeman.

Some other families who were early residents of the Ridge area were: Armstrong, Asby, Bagley, Barham, Bartlett, Bledsoe, Boone, Bowlin, Brents, Brown, Buchanan, Burns, Cashion, Clark, Cole, Collier, Cowley, Cox, Crenshaw, Creson, Epps, Foster, Freeman, Gamble or Gammill, Gibson, Gill, Glidewell, Gowen, Greer, Gunter, Hagler, Hannah, Hardin, Harkins, Holley, Johnston, Kings, Lambert, Leftwich, McAdams, McAnally, McNatt, McRady, Melson, Moore, Morris, Morton, Neese, Nichols, Nix, Norris, Olds, Pamflin, Patton, Petty, Phelps, Phillips, Piggs, Prosser, Pruitt, Purdom, Rany, Redd, Rees, Renegar. Richardson, Rives, Roberts, Savage, Schull, Sharp, Short, Simmons, Smith, Sorrells, Steelman, Sullivan, Sutton, Towery, Van Hooser, Wagster, Washburn, Whitaker, and Wright.

The Prosser and later Wagster families ran the early store located there. The first post office was opened in 1847. The early postmasters were: Thomas S. Glidewell, John M. Bearden, P. G. Prosser, August Hess, Alexander G. Gill, Jr., Perry G. Prosser, Daniel F. Freeman, and William H. Lambert. The post office was discontinued 12 March, 1858.

Early cemeteries in the area reflected many family names: Prosser (2 locations), Warren, Washburn-Melson, Freeman, Phillips, Foster Hollow, Mount Hermon, Stone, Waid, Redd, Muse-Stephenson, Harkins, King, Gilbert, Greer, and Johnston. Other cemeteries on the Ridge are those at Cumberland Presbyterian Church and Hickory Hill.

It is believed that the old Chestnut Ridge School was located at the present day Tucker home on US Highway 231. Lincoln County court records indicate that there were 46 pupils attending this school. Lincoln County approved a transfer of funds to Moore County to help cover the cost.

The Cashion Brothers, some early Ridge entrepreneurs, operated a distillery located at Stonesborough, perhaps the first (legal) still operated on the Ridge.

In this area, life was rough. There are many stories of gunfights and murders during its early settlement. Drury Richardson killed his son-in-law Mansel Bartlett over a cattle dispute. Another legendary murder occurred at the hands of Priscilla Prosser, daughter of James, who first married August Hess, a local gambler. The story goes that Hess lost a bet and that night went to his smokehouse to get some meat as payment for the gambling debt. Priscilla heard a noise, and thinking that a burglar was stealing from the smokehouse, attacked her husband with an ax. He died as a result of his injuries.

The Chestnut Ridge Farm

written by Lisa Martin

The Chestnut Ridge Farm is located on the Elk Ridge near the intersection of Moore, Lincoln, Marshall, and Bedford Counties. The farm started out being in Lincoln County, until Moore County, with Lynchburg being the county seat, was formed in 1871. In the early days the community of Chestnut Ridge supported a store, post office, stagecoach station, a school and a couple of churches. Chestnuts were collected at the ridge and sold to passing motorist on the nearby Dixie Highway. All the chestnut trees in the area died of a blight in the 1940's. If families could not get needed supplies on the ridge, they would go to: 14 miles to Fayetteville [county seat] in Lincoln County, 8 miles to Petersburg in Marshall County, 11 miles to Shelbyville [county seat] in Bedford County, or 21 miles to Lynchburg [county seat] in Moore County.

Researching the history of the Chestnut Ridge Farm was complicated because one has to search in two counties. Records were first sought in Lincoln County, because the Chestnut Ridge Farm's early land deeds were recorded there. An early pioneer, James Prosser from North Carolina was believed to have settled in the Chestnut Ridge/Mulberry Creek area after Tennessee was opened up as a new state in 1796. It was first thought that the Chestnut Ridge farm land came from James Prosser [1791-1854] and his wife Frances Richardson Prosser's [1802-1858] estate. James Prosser was a slave owner and his property was valued at $3000 [a large sum in those days] in 1850 in Bartlett Hollow behind the Chestnut Ridge Farm. We believe there was a James Prosser home site on Bartlett Hollow Road, where an early Prosser Cemetery was recorded to have existed. farm animals have desecrated the cemetery site and it is hard to tell a cemetery was ever there.

Searching Lincoln County courthouse records at the courthouse and archives, we thought that the Chestnut Ridge Farm was a piece of the James Prosser property, but in fact, James Prosser's son, James Asberry ["Berry"] Prosser[1824-1885] bought Chestnut Ridge farm of 180 acres for $1200 from his father-in-law's estate. James Asberry ["Berry"] Prosser married Rebecca W. Bagley [1832-1898] in 1848. Rebecca's father, John R. Bagley was a prominent farmer in the area who also had slaves. Berry was the fourth son, in a family of fourteen children. Berry was one of the founding county commissioners when Moore County was founded in 1871, representing the Chestnut Ridge Community. There was an early roadbed on this property with two houses in the hollow, that led to the James Prosser property on the backside of this property. Now only house foundations and wells exist of the two dwellings. In 1880 census records of Moore Co., freed slaves were recorded living with the Prosser family.

Berry also donated a log house and some land for a meeting place for a church and school. We don't have information on how long the school existed, but we have a donation list, that the community collected money for a well to be dug at Chestnut School. There is a Chestnut Ridge Church of Christ on the donated property, and the cornerstone on the right hand side reads: October 7, 1882. Although the church is covered with vinyl siding, there is a architectural style to it, that is reflected on several old farmhouses in the ridge area. The congregation still meets there.

It is hard to visualize the effort it took to farm this steep rocky hillside farm. A wooden box discovered at the Chestnut Ridge Farm,that is referred to as the "Prosser Box", is a time capsule of information about the everyday operation of the farm. The "Prosser Box" contained thousands of papers such as: a farm journal dating from 1869, receipts from various local businesses, including Elk Valley Distillery [in Kelso, dated 1896], Motlow and Co. [dated 1905], a Buick car registration dated 1918, more farm journals dating 1910-1929, and 1941, 1946-1950. The farm journals list the early Prosser's having mules, horses, cattle, and growing tobacco and corn that would have supplied Jack Daniel's Distillery. During WWII, papers show a 38 Ford "C" type among war gas rationing papers. Mules did the heavy labor, as there is no evidence of a tractor on the farm in the early days, the hillsides are so steep.

A story from the family grapevine says Berry Prosser was killed in 1885 by a tornado in a house in Fayetteville that was said to be built "tornadoproof". He is buried in our Prosser Cemetery at the Chestnut Ridge Farm. Berry's son J. J. [John Joseph or "Johnny"] Prosser took over the operation of the 236 acre farm in 1885. Johnny was Berry's fifth child [second son] of 11 children. Johnny built a sizable frame house with two rooms in 1890, then quickly added on two additions, His mother, Rebecca lived there until her death in 1898. A wedding took place at the Prosser  home place in 1900, when Johnny's sister Ezella married there. A metal roof [tile type] was installed in 1916. Gas lighting was installed in the main house in 1919, in which an original light fixture still exist on the front porch. The Prosser's were known to take in boarders, and teachers, and also had tenant families living in the two houses in their hollow. The Prosser Cemetery contains several Prossers along with other family and friends, burial dates ranging from 1876-1918, with several unmarked graves.

The Chestnut Ridge area was a hub of activity, with many farmers participating in a cooperative among themselves. Earl C. Prosser managed a grocery store/post office[later became Dunn Bros. Store] on the ridge, in which Johnny grew a lot of produce for. Johnny was known to go to markets in Petersburg and Fayetteville. The Prosser's had 12 apple trees, peaches, pears, cherries, blackberries, grew Irish potatoes, sweet potatoes, cabbage, onions, beans, corn, pumpkins, watermelons, tobacco, wheat, straw, hay, oats, rye, cane, and made molasses and honey. They listed as having Jersey cows, a slaughter/dairy income, mules, horses, hogs, sheep, turkeys, chickens [with egg income] at various stages of time. The Prossers were frugal, but had a steady income during the Great Depression and World War Two.

Johnny Prosser's first wife Fannie Pigg Prosser died in February 1929, and while he was in mourning he took a trip out West. Many inland people yearned to visit the ocean in those days, Johnny, at the age of 69, drove his Chevrolet alone to see the Grand Canyon National Park and Carlsbad Cave [automobile permit dated August 26, 1929, Number of firearms:0]. The next year he married a long time acquaintance from Fayetteville, Della Bell Brents Prosser. He was 70 and she 44, this was her first marriage. At age 3 years old, Della and her sister, Millie Bell [Cochran] age 4, were orphaned in Diana [Marshall Co.] in 1889. The girls went to separate homes, in which Della was placed with a prominent Brents family in Fayetteville. O. O. and Maude Brents, who did not have children, officially adopted Della in 1923, when she was 34 years old. When Mr. Brents died the next year, he left his family well off with several real estate properties. Della had supported herself working several years at Wright's Jewelry on the Fayetteville Square before she married. Besides running a farm, Johnny was president of First National Bank in Petersburg, he was very active in the community, and was a mason of high rank. He taught Sunday school for sixty years at the Chestnut Ridge Church of Christ, that adjoins their property. Johnny passed away at age 86, leaving the farm to his wife Della. Della and Johnny had been married 16 years.  In Johnny's will it states that if Della was to remarry, the farm would be "sold at public outcry" [auction], and proceeds go to nieces and nephews. Della was able to manage the farm with the help of a tenant farmer named John Raby for 26 years after her husband's death. Della's nephew, Henard O. Cochran and his wife Elizabeth "Lib" Bellamy Cochran [of Lewisburg, Marshall Co.] stepped in a couple of years and cared for Della in Lewisburg until her death in 1973.

>Because Johnny and his first wife Fannie, and his second wife, Della, had no children, the property was willed to Henard O. Cochran and some Prosser nephews. Henard settled with the nephews, and purchased the property outright.

Henard O. Cochran had grown up on another stretch of the Elk Ridge, in the Marshall County area called "Possum Trot" [or Luna], and had made trips up to the Chestnut Ridge area to see his aunt and uncle when he was a boy. When he visited this farm as a boy, he would say "the rolling hills had corn as far as the eyes could see". In 1924, Henard joined the United States Navy at the age of 16, he was absent from Lewisburg for 22 years, with periodic visits home. He retired from active duty as Lt. [j.g] in 1946, then serving ten years in the reserves. His duties while in the navy was supporting the medical field as a pharmacist's mate, basic training was at Quantico, VA., and Hampton, Portsmouth, VA. [twice], he received a lot of medical training on the east coast, served on hospital ships and in navy hospitals and with medical supply. His duties took him to places like Nicaragua, Charleston, S. Carolina, Newport, R.I. [twice], San Pedro, CA. [several time], Balboa, Canal Zone, Guam in the Pacific, Hong Kong, China, Japan, Singapore, Mare Island,Ca. [several times], Brooklyn, N. Y. [twice], Newport News, VA., San Diego, CA., Pearl Harbor, Philadelphia, Memphis [Millington-twice] TN., San Bruno, CA., Baltimore, MD., San Francisco, Fleet Hospital # 114 in Samar, Philippines, then released from active duty out of New Orleans in 1946. Henard married Vivien, a Swede from Brooklyn, N.Y. in 1933. Henard, Vivien, and Wayne [age 2] was present at Pearl Harbor during the attack on Dec. 7, 1941. Henard was in the harbor on the U. S. S. Dobbin on that fatal day. A promotion prevented him from going on to North Africa or Europe. He spent alot of the war in the South Pacific Theatre. A collection of over 300 war letters, photographs, and scrap books document their many travels. When he returned from the war, he got reacquainted with his family, worked at Hunter and Scott Furniture Store on the Lewisburg Square, where he grew to appreciate fine furniture. Henard attempted to save his childhood home and farm at Possum Trot, but with his father ailing, the farm fell on hard times and was sold. Henard lost his older brother Howard, first wife Viven, and father Thomas Cochran all around 1955. He supervised the construction and operation of a new water treatment plant, because of his chemistry and lab experience in the navy. He also became the building inspector for the City of Lewisburg. He then married Elizabeth "lib' Cochran. Lib had gone to business school and she worked for the American Consulate in Bern, Switzerland, during the war. They had met through working for the City of Lewisburg. She later managed the office at Walker Die Casting. When he retired from the city, he spent alot of his spare time refinishing antique furniture, and working on the Chestnut Ridge property 30 miles southeast of Lewisburg. He labored on reconstructing floor joist, patching windows, and attempted to get the 1890's structure livable. We remember him cursing at the thistles that had taken over the pastures. The old barn had to be abandoned due to storm damage and disrepair. A tree seems to be the only thing holding up the barn. He and his son, Wayne, worked hard to mend the fences to hold the cattle again. Henard would even get his grandkids to drive him up to the ridge to work, having limited eyesight due to cataracts.

Wayne followed his father into the United States Navy in the electronics field, serving 20 years during the Vietnam Era, retiring from service in 1980. Wayne, Ruth, and two children, Lisa and Troy lived in and around many military installations. Some places they lived were: Brunswick, GA., Memphis [Millington], TN. [twice], Alameda [San Francisco] CA., Denver, Colorado, Rota, Spain, Virginia Beach, VA.. Henard passed the Chestnut Ridge Farm over to his only son Wayne, before his death from lung cancer in 1981. Renovations were being started at the ridge house, when a house in Lewisburg that the Cochran's rented caught fire, due to a wall heater catching fire. All was not lost, as a church group from the First United Methodist Church in Lewisburg scrubbed down their belongings in an abandoned Kuhn's building on the square. They rented another house and proceeded with the ridge renovations. Wayne and Ruth Cochran with two children in college, employed ridge neighbors and friends to help renovate the 1890's home that had not been lived in for ten years. The original tin roof had to be replaced, and of course, all electrical, plumbing and heating system had to be installed. When their son Troy was out on college breaks, he would help with renovations on the house. Troy would also cut down sugar maples and sell the lumber to Jack Daniel's Distillery for college money. The Cochran's raised cattle and sold timber from the forest that covers two thirds of the property. Wayne worked as an engineer at Heil Quaker in Lewisburg, AEDC in Tullahoma, Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama, doing contract work for NASA. Ruth continued to work with [high school] special kids in Marshall County Schools for 23 years. Wayne had always been an avid hunter and gun collector, and that is why he enjoyed his farm so much. The first known tractor on this farm was a 50's vintage Ford, Wayne used during the 80-90's, to help grow a vineyard. The Cochran's would host turkey shoots to raise funds for the local Lions Club. Wayne served in thePetersburg Lions Club as president, and taught Sunday School at First Methodist Church in Petersburg. Wayne died of a heart attack on his beloved farm in 1997.

Today the Chestnut Ridge Farm is looked after by Ruth Cochran, her son Troy and family, and daughter Lisa Martin and family, and Elizabeth "Lib" Cochran of Lewisburg. The land is leased out to a local farmer with cattle, and every 10 years lumberjacks come by and cut lumber. Many pieces of antique furniture that Henard lovingly restored, are in the homes of Wayne and Ruth, Troy and Lorie, Lib Cochran, and Crawford and Lisa Martin. The grand kids, Cooper, Abbey, Kelsey, and Trevor love to frolic around the fields and explore nature. The Chestnut Ridge Farm is the stage for Cochran homecomings, birthday and holiday events.

The Faith Healer

This article is produced by the Chestnut Ridge Cousins Historian, John A. Foster.

In late 1913 or 1914 Robert L. (Bob) Foster became ill with mastoiditis, an infection of the bone behind the ear. After consulting with local (Petersburg, TN) doctors it was determined that he would go to Nashville for surgery.  In 1914 surgery and medicine were primitive by today's standards. Antibiotics were twenty years in the future. After a brief stay in the hospital following surgery Robert died.

Sometime later Golie Foster, Robert's brother, was diagnosed with mastoiditis also and the doctor advised him to go to Nashville for surgery. All of the family believed the surgeons experimented on Robert, so needless to say Golie refused to go.  The doctor then told Golie that he could take aspirin as long as that helped and then he knew what was coming.  As time passed his physical appearance deteriorated to the point where it was very noticeable to everyone.

At that time Golie lived on the Ridge very near to Horse Shoe Bend. One day while walking to the store Golie met Darn McCance*, one of the locals who had a reputation for being a faith healer. After the customary greetings and after chatting for a while Darn said "Golie, you look bad, What is the matter?" Golie told him the whole story, about the disease and the doctor wanting him to go to Nashville for surgery. He also told Darn about his brother having the surgery and dying from it and that he had refused, so he assumed the end was near.

After listening to Golie's story Darn asked "Do you mind if I look at it?" To which Golie answered "No". Now Darn was carrying a flat tin bucket. To those of you that are too young to remember a flat tin bucket it was a straight sided bucket of about two gallon capacity that was fitted with a tight fitting lid. It was used mainly to carry cream to the store to sell or trade for groceries. Now Darn set the bucket down in the road, smacked his hands together and rubbed them together, then laid his hands on  the area of the infection.

Golie later said it burned and hurt so badly that he almost went to his knees. Golie started improving and lived forty years, dying in 1955.

*McCance is pronounced like dance. I assume Darn was a nickname as I haven't been able to find any record of him. I have found McCants, so this may be the family. My father, Golie spoke with a Celtic brogue (Jerden for Jordan, Ambers for Ambrose etc) so that would explain the way he pronounced it.


Remember When...

REMEMBER WHEN NOSTALGIA

You cut a live Christmas tree off of the farm and the cedar smell in the house

All of the aunts, uncles and cousins were at grandma's house for Christmas dinner. Table setting were men went first, women folks followed and the children last. The cornbread dressing with giblet gravy was the highlight of the meal The afternoons were followed by a good old game of touch football.

When all of the family gathered at grandma's house and cut her firewood for winter.

The old fashion hog-killings usually around Thanksgiving. Fresh pork was abundant.

Going down to the creek to swim or fish.

When mother would go to the chicken pen and select a good fryer and take him out and wring his neck, dress and clean him for the frying pan. (Boy, that chicken was a bug and worm fed chicken without any hormones.)

Petersburg had an annual "Colt Show".

Petersburg had the "Sock Box".

Petersburg had Marsh's Department and Furniture Store.

When the boys had a white sports coat, black slacks, shirt of color and white shoes. (In those days people took pride in their dress appearance.)

When the boys had a "flat-top" haircut.

When you could have a sports idol that was not crooked.

When television was first introduced and maybe one family in the community had a set and if there was something special in programming occurring all would gather at that neighbors.

When the girls had a seam in the back of their hose

When the girls wore the hoop pettie coats.

When each family farm had a milk stand at the head of the entrance to the farm.

When the water source was a country well and if it was within the four county area most likely Jack Sorrells or_________Womble dug it.

When the half-moon outhouse was the convenience.

When there was a gospel meeting in the community with two services daily for ten days, after the crops were "laid by". Mother always housed the guest preacher.

When the old church buildings did not have air conditioning. The windows were pushed up in the summer for the bugs to fly in. There was an old stoker pot stove in the auditorium for heat and the cold souls would add the coal or wood and burn you up in the winter. Usually after this the wasp would come out of the wood work and pester everyone.

When we had the small community schools, usually 1st &2nd grades together, 3rd & 4th grades together, 5th & 6th grades together, 7th & 8th grades together or a one room school with all 8 grades together.

Remember playing cowboys and Indians at recess and yes you usually had a cap pistol

Remember when the little girls made the boys play house with them. Usually this was lined rock area. I always dreaded that, but come to think of it that was not bad after-all.
There was not a rating system on the movies and all were fairly respectful to carry a family to and watch.

When the boys always had their cars with fender skirts, side view mirrors, white wall tires and a great polish job.

Remember the 57 Chevy and the 57 Ford.

Remember the straight transmission with the 3 speed shifter on the column.

The days prior to interstate highways and you went through all of the small towns on the scenic route.

Remember the Old Cake-Walks.

Fresh tomatoes out of the garden, good country fried corn, good hot cornbread.

When as a young teenager some of the rougher boys spoke of smoking some of that "old weed" and innocent boys like me had no clue as to what they were talking about.

When the Korean War was going on and if you had family on the Battlefield in Korea that most of them sent home a jacket with a map of Korea on it. These jackets were pretty colorful.

When the speed limit in Tennessee was a blanket 65MPH on all country roads.

If you were a boy and big enough to reach the foot petals on an old hay hauling truck, you were drafted to steer it through the bales of hay after the hand throttle was set for the haulers to load.
-Bobby Prosser

Bobby those were great memories.  I was some what of a city girl, in KY & Michigan, so my memories are a little different
 You cut a live Christmas tree off of the farm and the cedar smell in the house

WE ALWAYS GOT OURS FROM THE LOCAL GROCERY STORE.  THE TREES WERE GROWN IN CANADA CUT IN AUG. BUT STILL SMELLED OF CEDAR.  NOW I HAVE A CEDAR CANDLE FOR MY TREE IS MADE OF PLASTIC.

All of the aunts, uncles and cousins were at grandma's house for Christmas dinner. Table setting were men went first, women folks followed and the children last. The cornbread dressing with giblet gravy was the highlight of the meal The afternoons were followed by a good old game of touch football.

MY FATHER WOULD ALWAYS TELL US THAT IN HIS DAY THE MEN ATE FIRST AND THEN THE WOMEN WITH THE CHILDREN LAST.  MY MOTHER THE "WOMEN'S LIBERATOR OF 1925"  WOULD GIVE HIM THE EVIL EYE.
 
When all of the family gathered at grandma's house and cut her firewood for winter.

MY GRANNY USED COAL
 
The old fashion hog-killings usually around Thanksgiving. Fresh pork was abundant.

CANNOT TOP THAT.  WE MAY HAVE LIVED IN THE CITY BUT WE WERE POOR.  WE ATE A LOT OF SIDE PORK WITH BEAN, GREENS AND FRIED.   I THINK THE ITALIANS CALL THAT PANCETTA.  WHO KNEW WE WERE SO CONTINENTAL.
 
Going down to the creek to swim or fish.

MY GIRL FRIENDS AND I WALKED DOWN TO THE CORNER TO THE CEMENT POND AND FLIRTED WITH THE LIFE GUARD

When mother would go to the chicken pen and select a good fryer and take him out and wring his neck, dress and clean him for the frying pan. (Boy, that chicken was a bug and worm fed chicken without any hormones.)

BEFORE WE MOVED TO MICHIGAN, DURING THE 2ND WORLD WAR, EVEN THOUGH WE LIVED IN THE CITY YOU COULD HAVE CHICKENS.  MY MOTHER HAD THAT JOB TOO. THEN SHE WOULD DUMP THEM IN A BLACK IRON POT AT THE BACK OF OUR YARD,  FILLED WITH HOT WATER, TO REMOVED THE FEATHERS.  I WITNESSED, AT THE AGE OF 3, MANY CHICKENS FLOPPING AROUND ON THE GROUND WITH NO HEADS.  NOW DAYS WE WOULD HAVE TO CALL IN GRIEF COUNSELORS FOR ME.  THE CHICKENS WERE FRIED IN LARD.  YES, THEY WERE GOOD TASTING.
 
Petersburg had an annual "Colt Show".

 IN THE BURPS OF DETROIT WE HAD CAR SHOWS.
 
Petersburg had the "Sock Box".   The Sock Box was a store on what I believe was the east side of the little square. It dealt mostly in foot wear. I bet your mother and grandmother would remember it. I bet they would have some good Petersburg and "Ridge" stories they could pass along.

I KNOW WHAT A SOCK HOP IS AND THE LOCAL CHURCH HAD A SOCK BOX TO COLLECT NEW SOCKS TO GIVE TO THE BUMS ON SKID ROW.

Petersburg had Marsh's Department and Furniture Store.

DETROIT HAD HUDSON'S AND SAMS.  HUDSON'S IS NOW PART OF DAYTON HUDSON WHICH NOW IS MACY'S.  SAMS WAY BACK THEN WAS A DISCOUNT DEPARTMENT STORE BUT HAD NOTHING TO DO WITH SAM'S OF SAM WALTON, WAL-MART, TODAY.

When the boys had a white sports coat, black slacks, shirt of color and white shoes. (In those days people took pride in their dress appearance.)

SEEMS ALL YOU BOYS DRESSED ALIKE, NORTH OR SOUTH.  THE YOUNG LADIES WORE WHITE GLOVES AND HATS.
 
When the boys had a "flat-top" haircut.

WHAT ABOUT A DUCK TAIL?
 
When you could have a sports idol that was not crooked.

WELL, I JUST DON'T THINK WE HEARD ABOUT IT THEN. 
 
When television was first introduced and maybe one family in the community had a set and if there was something special in programming occurring all would gather at that neighbors.

 TUESDAY NIGHT WITH UNCLE MILTIE, AT MY HUSBANDS FOLKS HOUSE.  THE ONLY ONES THAT HAD A 10 INCH TV OR A TV FOR THAT MATTER.  MY HUSBAND, FRANK, AND I GREW UP TOGETHER.
 
When the girls had a seam in the back of their hose

OH BOY, REMEMBER THE ONES WITH THE LITTLE JEWELS ON EACH SIDE OF THE SEAM AT THE BACK OF THE HEEL?

When the girls wore the hoop pettie coats.

HOW ABOUT THE ONES WITH 40 YARDS OF RUFFLES?
 
When each family farm had a milk stand at the head of the entrance to the farm.

OUR MILK MAN LEFT THE CHEESE, MILK, CREAM ON THE STOOP.  IF WE WERE NOT HOME HE WOULD COME IN AND PUT IT IN THE FRIG. SAME WITH ICE CREAM.  SAME WITH THE EGG WOMEN.  BACK IN THE 50'S EGGS CAME IN 3 SIZES SMALL, MID., AND LARGE.  NOW THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS SMALL & MID.  THEY ARE LARGE, EXTRA LARGE AND JUMBO.  THEY ARE STILL THE SAME SIZE AS BACK THEN JUST NAMED DIFFERENT.
 
When the water source was a country well and if it was within the four county area most likely Jack Sorrells or_________Womble dug it.

WE HAD A WELL, EVEN THOUGH THERE WAS CITY WATER AT THE STREET.  IT WAS IN THE 1940'S BEFORE WE HAD INDOOR WATER, THEN ONLY COLD.
 
When the half-moon outhouse was the convenience.

HAD ONE OF THOSE TOO. CIVILIZATION CAME SLOW TO THE BURGS OF PADUCAH, KY
 
When there was a gospel meeting in the community with two services daily for ten days, after the crops were "laid by". Mother always housed the guest preacher.

WE HAD NO PREACHER AT OUR CHURCH, JUST READERS.  REMEMBER I SAID MY MOTHER WAS A WOMAN'S LIB AND SHE WAS BORN IN 1903.  WE BELONGED TO ONE OF THOSE, AT THAT TIME, NEW AGE RELIGIONS.
 
When the old church buildings did not have air conditioning. The windows were pushed up in the summer for the bugs to fly in. There was an old stoker pot stove in the auditorium for heat and the cold souls would add the coal or wood and burn you up in the winter. Usually after this the wasp would come out of the wood work and pester everyone.

OUR CHURCH, IN KY, HAD FANS AT EACH SEAT. 
 
When we had the small community schools, usually 1st &2nd grades together, 3rd & 4th grades together, 5th & 6th grades together, 7th & 8th grades together or a one room school with all 8 grades together.

WE HAD GRADES TOGETHER ALSO.  IT WAS BECAUSE SO MANY PEOPLE MOVED FROM THE SOUTH TO MICHIGAN TO WORK AT WILLOW RUN TO MAKE AIRPLANES FOR THE WAR THAT THE SCHOOLS WERE OVER CROWDED.

Remember playing cowboys and Indians at recess and yes you usually had a cap pistol

MY FATHER WOULD NOT ALLOW TOY GUNS.  HE DID NOT BELIEVE THAT KIDS SHOULD PLAY AT KILLING.  HE HAD GIRLS, MAYBE IT WAS A BOYS THING.

Remember when the little girls made the boys play house with them. Usually this was lined rock area. I always dreaded that, but come to think of it that was not bad after-all.
There was not a rating system on the movies and all were fairly respectful to carry a family to and watch.

I SPENT MOST WEEK ENDS AT THE MOVIES.  ON SAT MORNING THERE WOULD BE A WHOLE HOUR OF CARTOONS.  WHEN THE MOVIE "JOHNNIE BELINDA" CAME OUT, LATE 40'S OR EARLY 50'S, ONLY THOSE OVER 16 COULD GET IN TO SEE IT.  MY MOTHER TOLD ME IF I WAS NOT LET IN TO COME BACK AND GET HER.  WOMEN'S LIB REMEMBER.  "jOHNNIE BELINDA" WAS ABOUT A BLIND GIRL THAT WAS WITH CHILD FROM A RAPE.
 
When the boys always had their cars with fender skirts, side view mirrors, white wall tires and a great polish job.

NOW YOU ARE TALKING DETROIT!
 
Remember the 57 Chevy and the 57 Ford.

BOBBY ARE YOU THAT OLD????????  OH! YOU MUST BE TALKING CLASSIC'S. :-)
 
Remember the straight transmission with the 3 speed shifter on the column.

LEARNED TO DRIVE IN A CAR LIKE THAT. 
 
The days prior to interstate highways and you went through all of the small towns on the scenic route.

NOW THAT I AM OLDER AND LIVE IN CALIFORNIA, I ALWAYS TAKE THE SCENIC ROUTE EVEN TO AND FROM THE GROCERY STORE.  THE DRIVERS OUT HERE ARE SOMETHING ELSE.
 
Remember the Old Cake-Walks.

WASN'T THAT A DANCE OF THE EARLY 1900'S?
 
Fresh tomatoes out of the garden, good country fried corn, good hot cornbread.

DOES ANYONE HAVE A GOOD RECIPE FOR FRIED CORN AND CORNBREAD THAT DOES NOT HAVE ANY SUGAR IN IT BAKED IN AN IRON SKILLET?
 
When as a young teenager some of the rougher boys spoke of smoking some of that "old weed" and innocent boys like me had no clue as to what they were talking about.

COME AGAIN!!!!!!!  WHAT DID YOU SAY???????????

When the Korean War was going on and if you had family on the Battlefield in Korea that most of them sent home a jacket with a map of Korea on it. These jackets were pretty colorful.

ARE YOU TALKING ABOUT THE "UNITED NATIONS POLICE ACTION"?
 
When the speed limit in Tennessee was a blanket 65MPH on all country roads.

THAT IS THE SPEED ON SUBDIVISION STREETS IN CALIFORNIA.

If you were a boy and big enough to reach the foot petals on an old hay hauling truck, you were drafted to steer it through the bales of hay after the hand throttle was set for the haulers to load.

I HAVE SET HERE FOR AN HOUR TRYING TO THINK OF SOMETHING IN MY LIFE TO COMPARE.  I CANNOT, YOU WIN!!!!!

-JULIA MOLITZ

Painting sweetgum balls silver and gold and stringing popcorn for
decorations on the cedar Christmas tree.

Heating a stone or brick by the fireplace to take to bed on cold winter nights.

Sleeping on feather beds in the winter time.

Didn't know what weed was back then but we tried smoking rabbit tobacco, corn silks and cross vine and made our own corn cob pipes.

Playing "Rook" during the winter time and playing "Spin the Bottle" at parties.

Helping Mama make lye hominy in the old wash pot using hickory king corn.

-Jack Towry

Yes, I remember the ducktail. I always wanted a flat top, but I never was afforded the opportunity to have one. In our family there was an uncle that always cut the hair of the "younguns" <grin>, and guess what, he could not cut a flat top. Someone mentioned bryl creme. I remember the vitalis. I wonder what happened to all those hair oil and tonic companies.

As a country boy do you remember the old farmers setting around an old stove on a winter day talking crops and cows?

Do you remember getting a cola drink and pouring peanuts into the drink?

Do you remember making a concoction of mixed peanut butter and banana into a sandwich?

Do you remember a pineapple sandwich?

As a country boy have you ever raised a pet orphaned lamb on a bottle and when it came time to send the lambs to market you had an attachment to the pet lamb, although in most cases he was as mean as a snake?

Betty Flo, The Petersburg Colt show also had an accompanying 4-H Club dairy show, with the Jersey Cattle as the dairy breed of popularity at that time. Bedford, Lincoln Marshall and maybe a distant county or two always had competitors. That is where I competed.

I remember in my early days of living in Bedford County and the early years of the Walking Horse Celebration. Shelbyville was always lively at that time of the year.

Do you remember when the flour sacks were salvaged and used to make shirts and other garments?

We were in discussion about vehicles, do you remember that old Jeep station wagon that they built in the late 40's early 50's? I believe that was the ugliest thing that was ever on the road. It seems like they ran when they felt like it. The garages always had one in for repair.

Do you remember when the politicians came to the courtyard at the courthouse and made their big promises if elected? Of course there was always a few around the audience that had partaken of some type substance and this added to the flavor.

-Bobby Prosser

Along with all these memories of cornbread, hog-killing, petticoats, and colt shows, I'd like to share some nostalgic information about the cost of veterinary care-as well as a veterinarian's income in olden times.  My dad, Ross Whitaker, a veterinarian, practiced in Lincoln County from 1919, after his discharge from the cavalry at the end of World War I, until his death in
July 1944.

My mother kept most of his daybooks and ledgers with entries from 1936-1944. For us today, when taking a cat to the vet may cost $99-or more-the prices he charged in those days, even when the Depression was beginning to lessen, sound unbelievable.

Until 1938, my dad practiced from a rolltop desk in the Yearwood mule barn on West Market Street in Fayetteville.  In about 1938, he and a WWI colleague, Dr. Horace Anderson, built a small hospital, now torn down, beside the mule barn on Firehall Hill.  Dr. Anderson, in the Army reserves, was called to active service in about 1940 or 1941.

After that, my dad practiced alone, answering calls throughout Lincoln County-and beyond.  He had been on calls on opposite sides of Lincoln County the night he died from a heart attack at age 54.  Dr. Cecil Byrd bought the practice in the summer of 1944.

Several years ago, I gave my dad's daybooks and other ledgers to the Tennessee State Archives in Nashville, keeping copies of a few pages.  Here is a sampling of the handwritten entries, with my notes in [ ], from those
pages:

9-29-1936       Roy Himebaugh, med. for cow, $1.00
12-4-1936       Moore Holman, trip to mare, $4.50
2-9-1937         Mrs. Clyde Rawls, cutting mare's tail, $12.50
4-12-1937       C.N. Bates,  two trips to hog, $3.50
7-25-1937       Rob Askins,  trip to horse, colic, $5.00 [These charges were paid "in kind": 3-25-39, gasoline by Mack, $2.00; 8-7-40, grease and oil by Mack, $2.50; cash, $.50]
4 & 5-1938      Will Washburn, 2 visits to mule, cow, $ 8.50  [Paid "in  kind":  5-38, $2.00 credit by load wood; 12-39, credit by $2.00 cash; 10-26-40, $1.00 credit by apples; 11-4-40, $0.50 credit by apples; 2-13-42; $1.50 credit by cash]
1-1-1940         Frank Rambo, 2 dogs 25cc each, distemper serum , $2.50
1-1-1940         Thornton Taylor, visit cow ,$5.00
1-1-1940         Wm. Lee Yearwood, visit cow, mastitis & med, $ 4.00
1-2-1940         Lawson Myers, 2nd dose [illegible] to pig Whitey [no charge entered]
2-2-1940         Marion Wright, visit cow, $6.00
1-2-1940         Henry Terry, visit cow, indigestion , $3.50
8-1-1942         Tom & Rob Sumners, cow P.P. [post-partum] ,$7.50
8-1-1942         Mrs. Whitsett, Del [Delina?] operator, med , [illegible]
8-2-1942         H.B. Warren, 1st dose rabies vaccine to 15 cattle, 2 horses $5.00  [Three additional rabies doses were given to "17 head," the last on 8-5-1942, as well as  "T.A. (tetanus antitoxin), and med, $2.50" to bay mare.]
8-3-1942         Robt. Tate, cow, ret. pla. [retained placenta], $5.00
8-4-1942         Mrs. Lula Stone, visit mule, $10.00

-Carolyn Whitaker Crowley

Cornbread

l  1/2 Cup yellow corn meal    3 Tblsp flour
2 Cups buttermilk                   1 tsp salt
1 Egg                                     1 tsp soda
2 Tblsp bacon drippings

Sift dry ingredients into bowl.  Add buttermilk and egg until combined (stir in by hand-no mixers).
Put your bacon drippings in your iron skillet and get it very hot and add your batter.  Bake at 450 - 20 to 30 minutes. (I usually bake 25 minutes.)  This will give you a nice crusty top and bottom.

                         Fried Corn

I take the fresh uncooked corn on the cob and take my knife and go down the ear, cutting off the corn into a bowl.  Then I take the back of my knife and scrape the ear to get the "milk" from it.  I repeat this for as many ears as I want.  I put bacon drippings in my iron skillet and heat it until it's warm and put the corn and juice from the ears in the skillet.  Salt and pepper to taste and cook for about 20 minutes.  Stir often so not to let it stick.

Halloween - when we soaped windows, threw corn on porches, actually dressed up (no such thing as treat or trick) and went all over the neighborhood and once, turned over the outhouse.

Speaking of outhouse. I was raised in Southern Illinois and got pretty cold sometimes.  Our outhouse was a bit away out and when one of my sister's or I had to go at night, we all 3 went because we were afraid.

Remember when it was a family affair on Memorial Day to go to the cemeteries and decorate the graves of our family, and always had a picnic lunch.

Lunch on the ground at the old country church and service lasted all day and into the evening.

Having no refrigerator or ice box, running milk, butter, cheese, and etc. down into the cistern to keep it cool.

Smoking ham, turkey and chicken in your own smokehouse.

Butchering the hog and making use of ever part of it--even rendering lard. (Don't miss that.)

Being able to listen to the radio only 30 minutes at a time because it was battery operated; no electricity.

Carrying candles to the attic bedroom, where it was dark and cold.

Playing games like hide-n-seek, kick the can, red-rover come over and telling ghost stories on the side of the road and getting scared and afraid to walk to the house.

-Betty Young

One wonders - how did they re-charge the battery?
 
I remember our battery-powered big console radio, too.  (But we had electricity - I guess the radio was just an older one, too valuable to get rid of and no money to replace it anyway.)

My memory of ours is for a very different reason, however:  Ours was powered by a big six-volt car battery.  When I was about three years old, (1932) a man came to repair the radio and set the battery out onto the living room floor.   Curious to a fault, I managed to tip that battery over, spilling acid on me, my overalls and the rug.   I remember the mad dash to the kitchen in my mother's arms for a fast plastering with soda, a bath and  change of clothes.  By that time, of course, the rug had a big hole all the way through it.
 
That (patched with a *sort-of* matching pattern) moved with us through several residences until about 1945 - each time the rug had to be placed just so, to put that patch under the sofa.

-Edward Chapman

I do remember Granny taking a chicken in each hand and swinging them around and around until only the heads remained in her hands.  The headless chickens would flop on the ground until they were still.  I remember the scalding water and the smell of the feather when she poured it over the chickens before plucking the feathers.  Then she would take a knife and scrape against the way the feathers grew to get out what remained.  She would clean out the craw to examine the contents.  It always amazed me to see all those tiny rocks.  You don't get chicken in the stores cut up the way the farm ladies cut them up.  The pulley bone was always my piece and still is.  Was I spoiled?  Yes and still am when it comes to the pulley bone.  Sometimes Granny would take the axe to the chicken head.  Don't know what determined her method of head removal but she sure could fry up some good chicken.  So can my mother.  After all she learned how from the best.

The Christmas tree?  I never knew when they were going to cut it down and bring it home.  It went in front of the living room window reaching the ceiling with just the right amount of room for the angel on top.  How Granddaddy knew just how tall the tree needed to be I don't know because he had no measuring tape.  I remember the popcorn that we strung and put on the
tree.  Granny had a string of lights that I remember with much fondness.  It was the bubble lights shaped like candles.  They started selling those again a few years ago.  There was never much money but Christmas was a big thing at my grandparents.  Mama and I lived there until I was school age at which time she moved us to Fayetteville so my first memories come from my
grandparents.  I remember the oranges and hard candy with designs in each piece.  Oh that was so good and a treat for us all.  That was the only time we got oranges and hard candy like that.  I still associate Christmas with them.

I love cornbread dressing.  What is it with stuffing?  Don't folks know that cornbread dressing makes the meal?  The big old table at both of my grandmother's house would groan with food, plates and glasses, and the elbows of all of us children.  We just couldn't seem to keep those elbows off the table.  There were no booster seats then so our elbows had to do the job for us.  Christmas dinner would be at one of the Grandparents and Thanksgiving would be at the other.  The next year it would be switched.  At Christmas after the dinner dishes had been cleaned and the men had talked we would load up and head to the other grandparents' house to exchange gifts.

I remember the milk stand that stood by the road.  It was sturdy enough to hold all of the full cans with Granddaddy slinging them from the wagon bed to the stand and for the milk truck guy to do his thing.  I have one of my step-daddy's milk cans and the numbers that go on it.  My grandmother and granddaddy each had their own cows to milk and their own side of the barn to
milk in.  Granddaddy did take her milk cans back and forth for her.  I guess each had their own numbers on the cans so they each got their own money from the milk.  That is a question I need to ask my mother.

The family didn't have much money but we sure did have love and enough to get by on.  My grandparents had 6 children and then here I come.  Thankfully the oldest son was already gone by that time.   I don't remember not having things to play with while at my grandparents.  There were the toys of my younger uncles, the dogs, and even a chicken or two.  Never a rooster.  They were too mean and one loved to flog me and take claim to my biscuit and whatever I had on it.  It was usually butter (real butter) and sugar.  If you haven't eaten that before give it a try.  I am afraid to try it now because things are not always as good as we remember for some reason.

I had can cans made from net and lace.  Mama would starch them.  If one did not make the skirt stand out enough you simply added can cans until you got the right oomph to your skirt and hoped and prayed that it would not fly up in front of your face when you sat down.  Mama always kept a box of starch on hand for her crocheted doilies and my can cans.  At one time we put small bells on them which prompted the principal to call a halt to that fad.  We also put them on our shoe laces.  Needless to say the girls sure made noise when they moved.

You didn't mention souse or lye soap.  Granny and Mama both made those. Souse--yuk!  They both along with other members of the family seemed to like them.  I can remember Granny putting pigs'' feet in a pot of water with the hoofs sticking out.  She would leave them on to boil while she went out to slop her hogs at night--and me sitting in the middle of the kitchen floor
with them.   I am now the proud owner of that "pigs' feet boiling" pot but you can believe me when I tell you I don't use it for the same reason.

I have to ask you what the "Sock Box" in Petersburg was?  I do remember hearing about the Colt Show and Marsh's Department and Furniture Store.  I also remember when my Grandmother died and being in the funeral home just
barely off the square.  That was the first time that I had seen an embalming table and the last.  Unfortunately it was upstairs where the bathroom resided.  I won't describe the table to you out of respect for those with weak stomachs. The gentleman who was there was not so thoughtful so my mother and I got a lesson that day.

Well that is part of my memories.- Peggy Coleman
goat man
If you lived in the four county area around the mid - 50's would you happen to remember the traveling "goat man" (see above) that traveled through the area for three or four summers? He had an old wagon and if I remember he had a team of several goats that pulled the wagon. He had some old tubs hanging off of the wagon and different things. I know he came through Bedford and Marshall Counties. If he came through Lincoln County or not I do not remember.

Other Petersburg memories were the country vet Mr. Jim Baraham, the electrician Mr Fishback Hathaway.

Old Morgan School.

Yes, Peggy I remember souse. Every now and then I will by some commercial souse, put it on cracker and add the hot sauce.

Do you remember when the country women exchanged eggs and lard at the country store?  I am like you about the pork lard. I think it would kill me if that was in my food today.

The cemeteries still have decoration day in the Southern section of Middle Tennessee after you get out of the Lincoln, Marshall, Bedford, Moore County area you hardly hear of it. I like the decoration over at Hastings Campground in Bedford County, where my Hastings family is buried. They have a complete program each year with their decoration. It is just sad that some "punk" had to destroy (burn) the old church building and do other destructive acts.

Do you remember summer rain on the old tin roofs?

Do you remember the peddler wagon coming through the countryside?

And when we speak of the Petersburg area, the Petersburg postal delivery ran through about three counties; Marshall, Bedford and Lincoln. The old original farm where I spent my first 12/13 years was on Petersburg, Rt. 1. "Turkey" Warren was the mailman. That area was in southwest Bedford County. I bet he would have some stories to tell. I think Kindred Bledsoe may have been our mailman at one time.

Bobby Prosser
From the book "Fat of the Land" by William C. Edmiston; Chapter 17; page 121
 WONDERS OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

The first automobile that graced the streets of the little town of Peterburg resembled a buggy.  It was owned by the postmaster, MR. RENFRO.  The automobile seemed to be operated by chains that ran back to the rear wheel, and often Mr. Renfro had trouble pulling some of the hills surrounding the town.  Between town and our home was a nice little hill and frequently three
or four efforts were made by Mr. Renfro before he succeeded in getting over it.  Whenever we heard him coming Papa, Mamma and we children lined up on the west porch and watched him in his efforts to get over the hill. Sometimes he had to back down the hill several times for a running start. After passing out of sight, Papa would say happily, "Well, he made it," and
we returned to our duties wondering over the great inventions of modern science.  In a short while other automobiles began to appear on the streets of the town and I recalled Papa saying of one young man, ROY BLEDSOE, "That boy is going to kill himself some of these days--turning these corners at fifteen miles per hour."

-Submitted by Bobby Prosser

Just to add a little more about Petersburg and the postmen that serviced her:
From the "Illustrated Magazine Edition"  "Lincoln County News Supplement Fayetteville, TN.  May 1904"  reprint by the LCT Historical Society

"J. M. Renfrow  Postmaster at Petersburg"

J. M. Renfrow is a native Lincoln Countian and was born near Petersburg in 1868, his parents being James F. Renfrow , who died a few years ago at the age of 86, and Mrs. EASTER (MOORE) RENFROW, who still lives and is 84 years of age, both numbering among the most honorable people of that good section.

Mr. Renfrow was reared on a farm and received his education at the public schools.  He has spent all his life at and near the home place, except for the spring of 1888, when he worked with his brother, now deceased, in the railroad office at McEwen, TN.

His wife, a most estimable woman formerly Miss Fannie Pylant, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. G. G. PYLANT, most excellent citizens.  She assists her husband in the office and is almost indispensable in the conduct of same. She understands every detail of the business, and to her we are indebted for the report of 53,899 pieces of mail being distributed on the three rural
routes from that office in 1903, and also the figures for the money order business there, which show that the office paid $2,449.62 for orders last year, an issued them to the extent of $4,881.66

-Submitted by Julia Molitz

Glidewell's Stage Stop at 'old' Chestnut Ridge
Taken from the Lincoln Co TN Heritage Book:

  The old Mulberry Road left the town eastwardly approximately by Mulberry Avenue, passing the old William B. Rhea place where the first County Fair was held, crossed Norris Creek, running a little north of the old Matthew Buchanan's 2000 acre LAND GRANT, passing to the west of the old Providence Methodist Episcopal Meeting House, on the old Aaron Parks place, J.J.Whitaker, Renegar and the Capt. John Morgan on land given by Elder John Whitaker, who lived a short distance up the road, on to Lynchburg and the Pond Spring, now Hillsboro.
 Elder Hardy Holman, the Lincoln County Holman progenitor, settled about a mile and one half north or the Mulberry Cemetery near old Mt Moriah Church. Some of the early settlers in the Bellville area were; Armstrong, Dollins, Small, Cole, Coalter, Orrick, Wiley, Pybass, Cunningham, Faulkner, Mansfield, Sullivan, Groce, Lane, Creason, Renfro, Pylant, Crane, Waids, Landess, Stone and Moore.
 The old road left the present road north of Bellville ran by the old Concord Meeting House, up the Stonesboro Road to the top of Chestnut Ridge, a ridge that received it's name from the abundance of huge chestnut trees that covered the Elk Ridge for generations. Sadly in a few years, in the 1930's, these wonderful works of nature completely disappeared. The road followed the ridge to the County Line by GLIDEWELL'S Stage Stop, now Chestnut Ridge Community, thence onto Shelbyville.
 Lincoln County Circuit Rider, Isaac Conger, settled one half mile north of Mulberry Cemetery, near old Mt. Moriah Church.He and his wife,Mary, and some of their children are buried on the home place, which is still in the hands of descendants.
 Revoluntary Soldier, Henry Moore, is also buried in the old Conger Graveyard west of the village of Mimosa know for a time as Bucksnort. Other settlers in the area were Warden, Johnson, Ashby, Hanks,GEORGE, Buntley, Pitts, Isom, Alexander, Parker and Stone.
 Boonesville was located on the old mail route that ran from Nashville by Columbia to Huntsville, A few of the pioneer settlers in and near the village were; Sawyers, Nelson, Wright, Wells, Bill, Davis, Hughey, Halbert, Cunningham, McMillan and Childress.
 The other westward fork leaving Fayetteville crossed Cane Creek near the mouth of Buchanan Creek and John Greer's Old Mill, turned southward crossing a bend of Elk River at Coldwater and on to Elkton.

tree
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